Sunrise on NC Beach

November 2010

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North Carolina Climate, the monthly newsletter of the State Climate Office of NC, covers a monthly climate summary for October with impacts to agriculture and water resources, and information on our new storm events mapping product.
PDF version available for printing.

 

Climate Summary

Departures from Normal
Temperature and Precipitation by climate division
Departures from Normal for October 2010 - based on preliminary data.

North Carolina generally experienced drier and much warmer conditions in October 2010 as compared to 30-year Normals. Many locations in the state experienced days with record-breaking heat and several days with temperatures in the 80s. Overall, the preliminary statewide average of 60.4°F ranks October 2010 as the 3rd warmest since 1985. Only October 1984 (60.6°F) and October 1919 (61.9°F) were warmer on average statewide than October 2010.

And while much of eastern NC welcomed drier weather after the record-breaking rainfall during the last week of September and first days of October, many parts of the southern Piedmont and mountain regions are getting a bit thirsty. Much of the southern Piedmont between Charlotte and I-95 received less than 1 inch of rainfall in October, increasing concerns for potential drought problems as we head into a winter that is more likely to be dry than wet in central and eastern NC. Statewide, October 2010 ranked as the 47th driest such month since records began in 1895.

A series of severe storms rolled through western and central NC during the last week of October bringing wind damage across the western half of the state and tornadoes between Lincoln and Granville Counties. While this storm produced several inches of rainfall along its track, the path was narrow and so had minimal benefits for drought concerns in the region.

MPE Precipitation
Precipitation for October 2010
Based on estimates from NWS Radar
Data courtesy NWS/NCEP

MPE Precipitation Percent of Normal
Precipitation for October 2010: Percent of Normal
Based on estimates from NWS Radar
Data courtesy NWS/NCEP

 

Impacts to Agriculture and Water Resources

Drier conditions were welcome for growers working to harvest peanuts, soybeans, and cotton. However, the “feast or famine” of rainfall certainly isn’t what growers need. That being said, in much of eastern NC, topsoil conditions are adequate for winter grain planting.

While the heavy rainfall in late September and early October erased any immediate concerns of drought in eastern NC, it continues to be of concern in the western half of the state. According to the US Drought Monitor, parts of western NC were in D1 Moderate Drought. Water supply managers in the Catawba and Broad River Basins continue to monitor streams and reservoir levels closely. Winter is the period when we generally see re-charge in water resources (groundwater, streams, surface reservoirs), and managers will be watching to see how much recharge occurs during this coming winter with a La Nina event and drier conditions expected.

The NC Drought Management Advisory Council continues to have weekly technical conferences to review conditions and make recommendations to the US Drought Monitor.


US Drought Monitor for North Carolina
Courtesy NC DENR Division of Water Resources

September 2010 Drought Monitor

 

SPC Storm Reports Interactive Database

Our new database allows users to interact with the severe weather reports provided by NOAA’s Storm Prediction Center (SPC). All tornado, hail, and wind reports from 1955 through the most recent completed year for the southeast are available, and a dynamically generated map can be created based on user-selected intensity criteria, date, and/or state.

The interactive map allows users to plot:

  • Tornado origins (touch-down location), tracks, injuries, fatalities, and the number of tornado reports by county
  • Hail events
  • Wind events

SPC Map Menu
Map layer options to display


Tornado Events By County
Tornado events, by county, for the past 10 years (2000 through 2009)


For more information about a particular event, click the “i” icon found in the map menu bar, and then click on a particular storm. An information box will appear that displays all of the official SPC storm data (date, location, intensity) that was issued for that event.

Tornado Event Summary
Information on the 1988 F4 tornado event

 

Statewide Summary for October 2010

As part of the monthly newsletter, the SCO provides a basic summary of monthly conditions for ECONet stations. A daily version of this product for all locations that have an automated reporting station is available online at:
http://www.nc-climate.ncsu.edu/cronos/review

Station
Avg Daily
Max Temp
Avg Daily
Min Temp
Total
Rainfall
Avg Daily
Wind Speed
Max Daily
Wind Speed
Vector Avg
Wind
Aurora, NC (AURO)
75° F
(+1.2° F)
4 mi
55° F
(+2.6° F)
4 mi
3.8 in
3.2 mph
20.8 mph
1.4 mph
West (275°)
Boone, NC (BOON)
69.9° F
(+8.3° F)
1 mi
46.6° F
(+8.9° F)
1 mi
0.2 in
4.4 mph
24.4 mph
3.2 mph
West Northwest (290°)
Buckland, NC (BUCK)
73.3° F
(+1.4° F)
15 mi
49.1° F
(+3.6° F)
15 mi
2.2 in
2.2 mph
15.4 mph
1 mph
West (260°)
Burnsville, NC (BURN)
67.5° F
(-0.9° F)
8 mi
42.1° F
(+4.4° F)
8 mi
2.7 in
3.8 mph
21.3 mph
3.4 mph
West Northwest (299°)
Clayton, NC (CLAY)
74° F
(+1.7° F)
3 mi
52° F
(+3.3° F)
3 mi
0.8 in
4.5 mph
26.2 mph
2.3 mph
West (276°)
Clayton, NC (CLA2)
75° F
(+2.7° F)
3 mi
47.4° F
(-1.3° F)
3 mi
0.8 in
1.6 mph
14.9 mph
0.7 mph
West Northwest (290°)
Clinton, NC (CLIN)
75.4° F
(+1.4° F)
0 mi
51.2° F
(+1.9° F)
0 mi
0.6 in
3.8 mph
19.3 mph
2 mph
South (172°)
Durham, NC (DURH)
76.5° F
(+5.1° F)
6 mi
47.4° F
(+0.8° F)
6 mi
2.4 in
2.7 mph
28 mph
1.4 mph
West Southwest (256°)
Fletcher, NC (FLET)
70.8° F
(+2.8° F)
0 mi
40.8° F
(+1.8° F)
0 mi
2.8 in
2.8 mph
23.7 mph
2.3 mph
North (352°)
Franklin, NC (WINE)
58.8° F
(-10.6° F)
11 mi
41.3° F
(-0.2° F)
11 mi
7 in
5.8 mph
29.6 mph
3.9 mph
Northwest (319°)
Goldsboro, NC (GOLD)
75° F
(+0.1° F)
5 mi
51.4° F
(+0.7° F)
5 mi
1.2 in
3.1 mph
18.2 mph
1.2 mph
Southwest (232°)
Greensboro, NC (NCAT)
73.2° F
(+3.6° F)
12 mi
48.6° F
(+1.1° F)
12 mi
2.7 in
3.4 mph
25.1 mph
2.1 mph
West (259°)
Hendersonville, NC (BEAR)
59.8° F
(-9.6° F)
7 mi
45.9° F
(+3.9° F)
7 mi
3.7 in
13.5 mph
47.5 mph
10.2 mph
Northwest (307°)
High Point, NC (HIGH)
73.5° F
(+1.5° F)
2 mi
46.7° F
(-1.3° F)
2 mi
2.4 in
1.7 mph
14.2 mph
0.8 mph
West Northwest (292°)
Jackson Springs, NC (JACK)
73.8° F
(+1.8° F)
0 mi
52° F
(+2.3° F)
0 mi
0.8 in
4.7 mph
27.5 mph
2.2 mph
West Northwest (285°)
Laurel Springs, NC (LAUR)
64.4° F
(+1.5° F)
1 mi
42.3° F
(+6.6° F)
1 mi
1.4 in
4.8 mph
33.7 mph
2.9 mph
Northwest (311°)
Lewiston, NC (LEWS)
73.8° F
(+0.7° F)
0 mi
51.3° F
(+3.6° F)
0 mi
1.2 in
2.6 mph
22.3 mph
1.4 mph
West (273°)
Mount Mitchell, NC (MITC)
53.1° F
(-2.9° F)
0 mi
39° F
(+1.2° F)
0 mi
1.7 in
17.2 mph
58.4 mph
16.4 mph
West Northwest (298°)
Oxford, NC (OXFO)
72.8° F
(+1.8° F)
0 mi
50.2° F
(+4.1° F)
0 mi
5.9 in
3.3 mph
23.5 mph
1.6 mph
West (265°)
Raleigh, NC (LAKE)
74.3° F
(+2.1° F)
0 mi
50.7° F
(+0.5° F)
0 mi
0.9 in
5.2 mph
28.3 mph
2.9 mph
West Northwest (285°)
Raleigh, NC (REED)
74.2° F
(+4.4° F)
3 mi
51.1° F
(+1.7° F)
3 mi
2.7 in
3 mph
15.4 mph
1.9 mph
Northwest (309°)
Rocky Mount, NC (ROCK)
74.8° F
(+1.6° F)
0 mi
50.9° F
(+2° F)
0 mi
1 in
3.7 mph
24.5 mph
1.5 mph
West (266°)
Salisbury, NC (SALI)
73.8° F
(+3.3° F)
0 mi
45.1° F
(+0.7° F)
0 mi
2 in
2.3 mph
20.4 mph
1.3 mph
West Northwest (299°)
Siler City, NC (SILR)
74° F
(+2.6° F)
5 mi
43.7° F
(-2.8° F)
5 mi
2.2 in
3.2 mph
15.8 mph
1.3 mph
West Northwest (302°)
Wallace, NC (WILD)
76.3° F
(-0.3° F)
8 mi
50.5° F
(-1.9° F)
8 mi
2.5 in
4 mph
38.9 mph
1.6 mph
West (271°)
Waynesville, NC (WAYN)
68.4° F
(+0.9° F)
0 mi
38.6° F
(+1.2° F)
0 mi
3.1 in
1.5 mph
27.2 mph
0.5 mph
North Northeast (28°)
Whiteville, NC (WHIT)
76.4° F
(-1° F)
0 mi
50.3° F
(+1.2° F)
0 mi
1.3 in
2.4 mph
18.2 mph
1 mph
West Northwest (295°)
Williamston, NC (WILL)
74° F
(+1.1° F)
4 mi
51.8° F
(+2.1° F)
4 mi
1.9 in
2.9 mph
18.4 mph
1.8 mph
West (271°)
Legend:
Parameter
Parameter's value approximated from hourly data.
( +/- Departure from normal )
Distance to reference station

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