Mountains of NC

Climate Summary: May 2013

Statewide Average Precipitation: *4.47 inches (43rd wettest since 1895)

Statewide Average Temperature: *64.6°F (30th coldest since 1895)

*Values generated from preliminary numbers

Cool Start, Warm Finish to May

May 2013 started off cool - almost cold (at least for May). Most of North Carolina experienced maximum temperatures in the first week of May that were some of the coolest on record for the month. However, temperatures in the second half of the month were quite a bit warmer, with overall mean temperature rankings for May 2013 only slightly on the cool side of history.

Maximum Temperature Station Rankings for May 1-7 2013
Rank is relative to each station's individual period of record.
http://www.sercc.com/perspectives

Mean Temperature Station Rankings for May 2013
Rank is relative to each station's individual period of record.
http://www.sercc.com/perspectives

Not Much Change in Precipitation Patterns

Precipitation in May was split between the "haves" and the "have nots". Storms tracked to the west, bringing substantial rainfall to western NC. Indeed, both Morganton and Boone reported the wettest May on record. In contrast, areas east of I-95 were generally dry, with many towns reporting one of their 10 driest Mays on record. To highlight this contrast, compare the rainfall ranks at Henderson and Tarboro. These locations are approximately 60 miles apart, but Henderson recorded its 4th wettest May on record, while Tarboro recorded its 4th driest May. Precipitation along the southern coast was even lower, with radar-based estimates suggesting less than 1 inch of rain during May.

Precipitation Station Rankings for May 2013
Rank is relative to each station's individual period of record.
http://www.sercc.com/perspectives

Precipitation for May 2013
Based on estimates from NWS Radar. Data Courtesy NWS/NCEP.
http://www.nc-climate.ncsu.edu/precip

Precipitation for May 2013: Percent of Normal
Based on estimates from NWS Radar. Data Courtesy NWS/NCEP.
http://www.nc-climate.ncsu.edu/precip

Several Reports of Localized Flooding

Damage reports in May were clustered with the heavy storms in western NC, where localized flooding was a common occurrence. Some hail and wind damage was also associated with these intense storms.

Local Storm Report Summary for May 2013
Data Courtesy NWS
http://www.nc-climate.ncsu.edu/lsrdb/index.php

Is Drought Still a Concern?

Precipitation in central and western NC eliminated any concerns about water resource supplies. However, drier conditions in eastern NC left some concerns about soil moisture levels lingering in May, especially in the primary crop production areas east of I-95. Of course, the remnants of Tropical Storm Andrea eliminated those concerns - but that's a topic for the next climate summary.

US Drought Monitor for North Carolina
Image Courtesy NC DENR Water Resources
http://www.ncdrought.org

Keywords: Climate Summary

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